Gold Masque’s Peter/Wendy

On Saturday November 17th, Gold Masque presented their play, Peter/Wendy, a twist on the classic Peter Pan. Not only was Gold Masque able to put on another fulllength performance, but they also conquered a storm (literally) and still kept high spirits.

As the audience walked into the auditorium, there were little notes that lined the entrance filled with seemingly everyday things that we take for granted. There wasn’t a lot there, but it was still a nice reminder. Then, audience members entered the auditorium to take their seat and saw the yellow notes on the back of every single chair, the walls, and some hanging from the ceiling. The cast later told us that they thought of over 3,000 of these “happy thoughts” in total. They were also raising money for an Alzheimers awareness organization, and when someone donated, they could write their own happy thought on a card.

Screen Shot 2018-11-29 at 5.15.45 PM

The other thing the audience noted as soon as you walked in that was a little different, was that the actors were already on the stage. Playing around and laughing, the actors and actresses seemed to be unaware of the audience, until they quieted everyone and began their story.

When the lights went off after only an hour, there were some murmurs of uncertainty. In particular, Selin, a senior, thought “the ending was confusing”, which was a common opinion amongst a lot of students. At times the dialogue seemed a little abstract and the transitions were sometimes unclear, but senior Allie D’Andrea, production stage manager, cleared it up for me. “It was a sleepover,” she told me, “The kids played Peter Pan and then went back to sleep.” Knowing this, most of the plot makes more sense. It also helps clarify why everyone was already on the stage from the beginning and were acting like they were telling a story to the audience. Macy, a sophomore, was wondering why there was only one set when the setting seemed to be constantly changing. Allie’s explanation answers this also, because the actors were using their imagination, and so the audience does as well.

The pirates were popular for their comedic relief, “I loved Smee!” exclaimed senior Lizzy. Featuring seniors Jamie Manley as Smee and Cristian Puhlovsky as Hook, they were able to coax a lot of laughs just like in the movie that we all love. Tinker Bell, portrayed by Izzy Williams, was also a huge hit for her hilarious expressions and feelings about Wendy.

Screen Shot 2018-11-29 at 5.15.39 PM

As I mentioned before, Peter/Wendy uses scenes from the original Peter Pan, which not a lot of the audience understood. Peter said multiple times, “I forget them after I kill them,” which was quite a surprising statement if you were expecting the Disney version of Peter Pan. “In the original Peter Pan, Peter used to kill the lost boys when they started growing up,” Mike Dekens, a junior, told me after the play. So although it was a little dark, Gold Masque stayed true to the original, including the interactive scene bringing Tink back to life after she drank poison intended for Peter.

My favorite part of the play, while a little tragic, was the ending when Gianna Trivisani, who played Wendy, snapped and the lights went off to finish the play. This was after she was locked out of her window, making her think that her parents shut her out when it was really Peter’s idea. It was a dramatic way to end the play, causing the audience to break out into applause.

Although this performance was a little more confusing than some of Gold Masque’s other plays, it was still enjoyable as always.

By: Gretchen Buchmann ’19, Staff Writer

Featured Photos: The Gold Masque cast perfoming on Ramapo’s stage (Photo courtesy of Corinna Collins).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s